Free Radio Press
formerly
Radio Resistor's Bulletin

Back Issues and Contact Info

Radio Resistors Bulletin #15, Fall 1996

Dear Readers,
Welcome to the latest issue of what used to be the Radio Resistors Bulletin, now named the Free Radio Press. You may wonder why the name is changed. The scope of the journal is now widened to include Internet, freedom of information and other first amendment issues as well as micro radio. Our last editor, Frank Haulgren has stepped down and now I am putting the journal out. If anyone has ideas or is interested in helping to put the Press out, don't hesitate to participate! This is the first edition under the new moniker. I am excited about the job and hope to send an issue out every two months. We still have the same web page address for the bulletin, Http://www.rootsworld.com/rw/feature/rrb.html If you receive extra copies this time, just let me know, this is still a new experience, prone to technicalities. U.S. Postal service subscriptions are $14 a year.
Enjoy and send me back some feedback about what you think.
--Michael Braunstein, editor, Free Radio Press.
Mbrauns1@wwisp.com


Contents:


Date sent: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 14:21:51 -0700 (PDT)
From: Stephen Dunifer
To: Michael Braunstein
Subject: Re: rrb

Sounds good, I am glad you are picking this project up. It looks like we will having a National Free Radio Conference in Berkeley the weekend after the elections in November. I will keep you informed about this as it develops. I will see what we can contribute to the publication. I am enclosing our most recent update.

Stephen Dunifer

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

In response to your information request:

(Visit our website: www.freeradio.org)

YOUR SUPPORT AND INVOLVEMENT ARE URGENTLY NEEDED. If you can donate any amount of money to our legal defense it would be greatly appreciated. Please note on the check that it is for the legal defense fund. Public awareness of this movement continues to increase thanks in part to rather extensive and favorable news paper and magazine articles. As a result more stations are taking to the air. But this is placing a major burden on our limited legal resources and staff since requests for legal information n and support are increasing in direct proportion. The efforts of Free Radio Berkeley attorneys Luke Hiken and Allan Hopper and the National Lawyers Guild Committee on Democratic Communications must be adequately supported to insure that our continued legal efforts are successful.

To summarize the current situation - court action continues with the FCC. After much delay the FCC finally ruled on the administrative appeal we had filed almost two years ago on the matter of the $20,000 fine against Stephen Dunifer and Free Radio Berkeley. Of course, it took a court decision by Federal Judge Claudia Wilken to force this ruling. In this ruling they take a rather indefensible position by stating that it would not be in the public interest for those currently without a voice to have one through low power FM service. Further, they go on to say that the greatest diversity of voices can be best served by the full service broadcasters and shut the door entirely on the possibility of micro power FM stations. Just substitute "corporate interest" every time they say "public interest", this will give a truer perspective on the matter.

Currently, this is the legal status. On December 4, 1995 the FCC filed a motion for summary judgment on a permanent injunction to silence Free Radio Berkeley. Judge Claudia Wilken has shown an interest in allowing us to have a trial on the merits to determine the facts and is unlikely to grant the FCC's motion. In character, the FCC is taking the rather arrogant attitude that the court only has jurisdiction as long they rule in their favor. After a paper fusillade of response and counter response we appeared in Oakland Federal Court on Friday, April 12 1996 for a hearing on the motion for summary judgment.

After hearing oral arguments, the judge took the motion under submission. A ruling will be issued at some point. If this motion is denied it is likely the F CC will appeal this to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Two actions are possible by the 9th Circuit, they could reject the appeal on its face and throw it back to Federal Judge Claudia Wilken or they could take it under consideration. If the former happens it means we would go to trial in late 1996 or early 1997. Otherwise, it will be a year before the 9th Circuit holds a hearing on the appeal and at least several months beyond that before an opinion is released. If the appeal is rejected, it is back to trial or we appeal the granting of the injunction. Whew !

What this really means is that this matter will not be settled anytime soon and the whole issue of Micro Power broadcasting is going to remain in a gray area of neither being legal nor illegal, according to our attorneys. The window of opportunity remains open. Now is the time to make a concerted national effort at the community level to put as many stations on the air as possible. Let ten thousand transmitters blossom !

This window of opportunity exists largely due to our incredible attorneys who have put a great deal of research and time into defending Micro Power broadcasting. Our legal costs are increasing as the legal battle continues. Your financial support is critical to the success of this battle for free speech. Any amount you can send will help. If you can organize fund raisers, do door to door canvassing, put on benefits, etc. that would be great. We have videos that can be shown for public events.

For those who wish to put their community voice on the air, we are simplifying the selection process by offering our kits as a package which includes everything you need to get on the air (exclusive of audio equipment). You need some basic skills in electronics and such in order to construct the kits.

One frequently asked question is: how much power do I need ? This is somewhat difficult to answer since terrain and antenna height affect coverage more than anything else. Raising the antenna to a good height will do more than increasing power at a lower height since earth curvature has to be taken in account and the fact that FM transmission is line of sight. Take the square root of the height above average terrain and multiply by 1.4 to obtain the distance to horizon. At 50 feet this is a distance of about 10 miles. Obviously, if you can position your antenna on either the side or top of a hill you will get really good coverage. In one situation a 40 watt transmitter high on the side of a mountain was able to achieve a range of about 25 miles.

Generally speaking, under ideal circumstances, 1/2 watt is good for a 1 to 4 mile radius, 6 watts - 4 to 8 mile radius, 15 watt - 6 to 12 mile radius and 30-40 watts - 8 to 20 mile radius. In order to double the range at a specific power level you will need to increase the power by a factor of 4.

1/2 Watt Package - $285
6 Watt Package - $320
15 Watt Package - $410
40 Watt Package - $480

20 Watt on the air Quick Package - $595
(includes Comet antenna, partially assembled 1/2 watt PLL and easy to
build, no-tune 20 watt amplifier plus enclosure)

Every package includes power supply, frequency counter, power meter, filter, dummy load and transmitter enclosure. All transmitters use a phase locked loop controller to keep the frequency stable. With the exception of the 1/2 watt transmitter, each package has a 1/2 watt exciter combined with an RF (radio frequency) amplifier to boost the 1/2 watt signal to the required power level. The power meter is used for tuning the transmitter and antenna while the frequency counter is used to measure operating frequency. A dummy load is used for testing and tuning the transmitter. For an additional $50 the 1/2 watt PLL exciter can be supplied as a mostly assembled kit.

To finish out the package you will need an antenna and coaxial cable (used to connect the antenna to the transmitter). The dipole antenna kit is the simplest to build. Cost is $25.00 For those who wish to buy a pre-made antenna we have a commercially made Comet 5/8" wave ground plane (5-6 foot vertical antenna with 3 radials sticking out from the bottom) available for $115. Every type of coaxial cable will attenuate your signal by the time it reaches the antenna. In order to reduce this loss we suggest you use low loss cable. Belden 9913 is provided at $1.00/foot including end connectors (PL259). Higher loss RG8X is also provided. See the full catalog listing in the newsletter. Please note that we are no longer offering the 5 watt transmitter or 1/2 watt stereo transmitter.

If you decide to put a station on the air, your signal should be as clean and stable as possible. This will deprive the FCC of many of its arguments against Micro Power radio. That is why a filter is necessary to knock down harmonic signals which might cause interference. Further, in picking a frequency you need to have enough adjacent channel separation. If you pick 88.5 for example, it should be clear along with 88.3 and 88.7 as well if at all possible. To aid in picking a frequency the FCC FM database can be searched on an Internet WEB site. In addition, you will need an audio limiter between the audio mixer and the transmitter. This will prevent signal splatter and spurious signals from being generated as a result of the transmitter being over driven by the audio signal. Every precaution should be taken to prevent interference with other stations and communications services. We are offering a compressor/limiter from Beringer at a cost of $190.00. A very inexpensive limiter is being evaluated at this time and may be offered at cost of less than $50. See the catalog listing for further information on compressor/limiters.

Hundreds of Micro Power stations have taken to the air across the United States. It is a critical time for free speech and the democratic right to communicate. We invite you to join in this movement to reclaim the airwaves in whatever way you feel is appropriate. A national effort is needed to establish Micro Power broadcasting as a free speech right. Organize your communities around this issue. If people can not communicate, how can they effectively organize to achieve whatever goals they have set out ? Micro Power broadcasting is an effective tool for this. Break the corporate stranglehold on the free flow of information, news, ideas, cultural and artistic expression. Get involved now!

Free Radio Berkeley
1442 A Walnut St. #406
Berkeley, CA 94709
Phone: (510) 464-3041
Email: frbspd@crl.com


********************************************************************
FREE RADIO MICROPOWER BROADCASTING CONFERENCE
********************************************************************

November 8,9,10 - 1996

548 20th Street (local 2850 HERE union hall)

Oakland, California

Free Radio Berkeley is sponsoring a free radio micropower broadcasting conference. It will be held on the second weekend of November. It will offer lots of technical workshops along with an opportunity for everyone to get together in several large sessions with small group breakouts to discuss and come up with a collective strategy and vision for the future of free radio. Registration fee is $10-$30 sliding scale.

The schedule is as follows:

Friday, November 8:

8PM - Featured Speaker (TBA) fundraiser for the National Lawyers Guild Committee on Democratic Communications. $5-$15 sliding scale.

Saturday, November 9:

Conference begins - 9AM - 10AM registration 10AM-12:30PM Introduction/Plenary/Strategy Session 12:30 PM - 1:30 Lunch 1:30PM-3PM Workshops 3PM-5PM Workshops 8PM Party

Sunday, November 10:

10AM-11:30AM Workshops 11:30AM-1PM Workshops 1PM-2PM Lunch 2PM-4:30PM Final wrap-up strategy session

Workshops include:

Legal
Transmitter/station set-up
Mobile & event broadcasting
Audio production and editing
Internet
Interviewing techniques
Antennas
Micro TV
Latino Caucus
Women's Caucus
Youth Caucus

More workshops are in the mix. If you wish to present a workshop please contact us.

Getting there:

If you need housing please let us know. A housing group is working on finding local folks who will put you up for the weekend.

For a conference packet please call (510) 464-3041 and leave your name and address. An email packet will be available as well. Also, check our web site wwww.freeradio.org.

See you in Oakland.


So: U-map
From: Larry or Lynn Tunstall beedleum@netcom.com
Subject: Pirate-radio web site (Usenet posting)
Pirate Radio Web Site
glen@speedline.ca
Zippo

Check out Canada's only web site dedicated to pirate radio. Online pirate radio newsletters, text files (including how to start your own pirate radio station), audio clips (now in Real Audio), pictures, our own loging area, current info on where to find the most current Pirate radio stations, and much more. The address is: http://www.speedline.ca/~glen

Glen Glisinski
glen@speedline.ca


>From: timothy@dash.com (Timothy Buczak . KGNU)

Grassroots Radio Coalition Formed

Contact: Marty Durlin(marty@kgnu.org)
303-449-4885 KGNU WERU Cathy Melio 207-374-2313
http://www.kgnu.org/grassroots

More than audio outlets, volunteer-based community radio stations are cultural institutions in their communities, reflecting the unique concerns and passions of the people who live there. With a system of governance based on openness and collaboration, and diverse programming produced by volunteers and funded by listeners, these stations are cornerstones of participatory democracy, offering ordinary citizens the chance to exercise First-Amendment rights in a mass medium and audiences the opportunity to directly support the programming that is of importance to them.

More than 80 people met in Boulder CO July 26-28 for the first Grassroots Radio Conference, convened by KGNU in Boulder and WERU in Blue Hill ME. Representing more than 30 organizations nationwide, attendees took part in workshops and panels focusing on news and public affairs, music, pirate radio, advocacy, audience considerations, the internet, management, outreach and events - all tailored to the specific needs of volunteer-based stations.

A message from the 'godfather of community radio,' Lorenzo Milam, was included in conference materials.

The purpose of the conference was to affirm the mission and institution of grassroots radio, and to strengthen those stations still committed to the inclusion of community volunteers in programming and decision-making.

Organizers are concerned that the original vision of public broadcasting -'giving voice to the voiceless' - has been eroded and in some cases, extinguished. The present world of public broadcasting includes conference sessions on 'High Impact Selling' and 'Power Selling.' Bills introduced by Congressman Fields and Senator Pressler would eliminate 'diversity' as a goal for public broadcasting. Licensees are being encouraged to sell noncommercial frequencies for commercial purposes. Religious organizations are snatching up noncommercial frequencies in order to propagate right-wing political views. Public radio formats are ruthlessly adapted to audience expectations.

For grassroots stations, this situation is brought home by the fact that community producers are no longer central to the missions of even NFCB or Pacifica, and Arbitron has become an acceptable tool for measuring the success of community stations.

Community broadcasting at its best is a dynamic interchange among members of a community, a fertile ground for cultural, artistic and political expression. While it has sometimes been amateurish and silly, it has always had a sense of purpose that was distinct from that of commercial broadcasting. That difference is now disappearing. If community radio becomes just another format, we will have lost a rich community resource and a precious opportunity to guide our own fates.

Conference registrants agreed to meet next year for GRCII. The group stopped short of forming a new organization but vowed to communicate with each other and exert influence through a loose formation, the Grassroots Radio Coalition.

Action items include completing a data base, communication through the internet and other avenues, program exchanges and exploring the production of a national grassroots news program through the use of Internet audio files.


From: Paul W. Griffin Paul_W._Griffin@bmug.org
Subject: Radio Califa off the air!

Dear Readers,
It is my sad duty to tell you that Radio Califa is going off the air September 29. This is due to internal squabbling and has nothing to do with the FCC. This is the same station that used to be known as Radio Ilegal and had to go off the air in April after KSTS channel 48 did a special report and brought us to the attention of the FCC. After throwing a successful benefit and raising about $600, we were back on the air at 102.5 fm and re-forming the collective. We almost made it 4 months before a certain individual decided it was time to pull the plug on the project. What he did was change the lock on the studio and not give anybody a copy of the key. You can imagine how the volunteers felt when this happened. He's been playing the same cd's for the past three days and the situation really sucks. His idea for how to proceed is that we should move all of the equipment over to his house and let him take total control of everything that goes on the air. Does this sound like fascism or am I just being too paranoid? I refuse to take part in such a stupid idea and would rather not support this effort. I'm not going to sabotage this guy's efforts, I just don't want to help him. Anyway, I have never heard of anything like this happening to a pirate (pardon the expression) radio station and I would like to get your response on how to deal with this problem. Please find the time to write me a message and tell me what you think? How should we continue? Thanks for taking the time to read this.
-Paul


From: "Mark E. Worth" 104065.1007@CompuServe.COM
Subject: KCMU blurb

SEATTLE - Take a university-owned radio station, add a slippery, secretive management staff, throw in some hard-nosed volunteer news staffers, douse the whole mixture with a splash of lefty activist fervor, simmer to a boil and you've got a steaming mess called KCMU.

Situated on the third floor of the University of Washington's Communications Building and at 90.3 on the FM dial, the 25-year-old radio station has survived numerous attempts by UW bureaucrats to turn the break-even operation into a commercialized cash cow. KCMU is still clinging to a free-form, listener-driven programming style - but just barely. The latest round of changes handed down by management - without input from the station's volunteer staff or 40,000 listeners - threatens to send the award-winning, 404-watt station tumbling into the bottomless pit of commercialism.

First, in June, General Manager Wayne Roth - an ensconced UW bureaucrat - unilaterally canceled the station's daily "News Hour." The show, 30 minutes of Pacifica Network News and 30 minutes of locally produced material, represented the only progressive information programming consistently available on Seattle's increasingly corporatized airwaves. Also lost were respected syndicated shows such as Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting's "Counterspin" and David Barsamian's "Alternative Radio," along with reports from "The Nation," "Along the Color Line" and other progressive sources.

Then, in September, Roth announced that paid on-air personalities later this year would replace the 11 volunteers who currently staff the station from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. The irony of the decision was not lost on KCMU supporters. Roth rationalized cutting the News Hour because it was too expensive - about $8,000 a year. Three months later, however, he said the station could afford to spend $60,000 annually for DJ salaries. To do so, Roth may have to tap the deep well of the UW's flagship station, KUOW 94.9-FM. (There's really no way to tell; the stations' budgets and operations were merged last year.)

Then, on Sept. 30, Roth lieutenant Don Yates fired DJ Marshall Gooch after the long-time station volunteer issued an on-air rebuke of management's paid-DJ scheme. Careful to choose his words, Yates said Gooch "misrepresented" the station. He avoided the word "criticize," which may have put management in jeopardy of abrogating the terms of a notable 1994 federal court decision. In the so-called "Zilly" case, UW officials - including Roth - were found in violation of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution for firing volunteer DJs who chastised station management.

Still ongoing are behind-closed-doors talks between Roth and counterparts at KPLU 88.5-FM, a public station operated by Pacific Lutheran University in nearby Tacoma. For more than a year now, Roth and KPLU chief Martin Neeb have explored a merger involving KCMU, KUOW and KPLU. No formal agreement has been reached, but station brass and an East Coast consultant have proposed several scenarios, ranging from a loose cooperative to a full-blown merger. Most of the proposals would homogenize programming, making the three stations easier to target market and more palatable to corporate underwriters. Media experts decry such a strategy as the commercialization of public broadcast frequencies, heretofore sacred resources immune from free-market whims.

Despite the presence of lengthy, detailed merger schemes proposing big changes at KCMU, Roth told a local weekly publication recently: "We are just absolutely committed to [KCMU's current] format. No one believes our honest intentions."

Truthfulness, however, isn't one of Yates and Roth's strong suits. Yates told the media recently, for example, that the paid-DJ plan was hatched by the now-defunct KCMU Task Force. However, the panel - which was created and staffed by Roth himself - concluded in May 1994 that "volunteers should be used in the operation of the station [because of] financial and practical realities." Yates has yet to publicly explain his twisting of the facts.

In the weeks to come, Yates and Roth may have to do more explaining than they ever bargained for. The UW's Public Radio Advisory Board has empaneled an ad hoc committee to evaluate Roth's unilateral decision to cancel the News Hour. Though the Advisory Board is just that - advisory - several of its members have been publicly critical of Roth's tight-fisted control of the station.

Meanwhile, Gooch is exploring his legal options in the wake of his unceremonious firing, which was punctuated when the combination to the station's office door was changed - while Gooch was still on the air. Roth was dragged into court three years ago when the UW was sued by C.U.R.S.E. (Censorship Undermines Radio Station Ethics). Another lawsuit - and another $100,000-plus judgment against the school - could make UW higher-ups think twice about Roth's leadership abilities.

A citizens group formed out of the controversy, Community Powered Radio, has held a well-attended rally and several public meetings, written letters to the editor, plastered the city with informational flyers, gathered more than 2,000 signatures in support of the News Hour, and received endorsements from the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Ralph Nader, Norman Solomon, Michael Parenti, and dozens of local political leaders and advocacy groups. For more information on the campaign to stop KCMU's slide toward commercialism, contact CPR at 206-782-8292, by e-mail at eoaim@speakeasy.org, or on the Web at http://www.speakeasy.org/eoaim.

-Mark Worth is a member of the Research Committee of Community Powered Radio.


- The alternative newsservice -

http://www.lglobal.com/TAO/ainfos.html

* News * Analysis * Research * Action *

R A D I K A L
U P D A T E
SOLIDARITEITSGROEP POLITIEKE GEVANGENEN (SPG)
(SOLIDARITYGROUP POLITICAL PRISONES)


** Topic: Press release SPG: about the digital Radikal **
** Written 12:07 PM Sep 11, 1996 by tank@xs4all.nl

Amsterdam, September 9, 1996

German Prosecution starts investigation into the digital Radikal.

On Monday the 2nd of September the BRD State Prosecution started an official investigation against 'unknown distributors' of the Radikal-magazine on the Internet. These 'unknown distributors' are suspected of violating the German law:

129a Abs. 3 StGB : Recruiting for an illegal terrorist organisation, 140 Nr. 2 StGB : Approval of criminal offences, 130a Abs. 1 StGB : Calling for criminal acts.

The digital version of the Radikal is accessible through computers in the Netherlands and the United States.

Besides this legal investigation, the German BAW (prosecution office) has ordered German Internet Providers to block the access to the digital version of the Radikal. A number of providers and associations of providers has given in to this call. This means that all websites of XS4ALL-clients in the Netherlands and of DataRealm-clients in the USA have been made inaccessible for German Internet users. In reaction to this German attempt to censor the Internet mirrorsites (identical copies) of the Radikal have been put on various computers throughout the world.

Since December 1995 we, the Solidaritygroup Political Prisoners, have added the full edition of the in Germany illegal magazine Radikal to our homepage on the World Wide Web. On this moment major parts of number 153 and the full edition of number 154 are accessible through the World Wide Web. We decided to do this after a renewed attempt (one of many over the years) of the German authorities to silence the Radikal.

The Radikal is a magazine made by and for the radical left movement in the BRD. The magazine was set up in the mid '70-ies as a means of communication between various left-wing organisations. After a series of homesearches, arrests and long-time prison sentences, it was clear for the makers that they couldn't continue the magazine on the same basis. It was decided then to make the future editions of the magazine outside the view of the German authorities.

Because the German Prosecution couldn't localise the makers of Radikal, a short period of quietness followed in which no policeraids etc. took place. Than trouble started anew. This time it were not the makers of the magazine who were targeted, but the persons who sold the magazine, bookshops and infocafe's. Through the years there have been hundreds of police raids, numerous arrests and many people have spent months and years in jail for "supporting a terrorist organisation" (i.e. distribution of the Radikal). As a result of these experiences the distribution of the Radikal is no longer organised through bookshops etc., but through a underground network.

Mid June 1995 the German Prosecution stroke again. All over Germany special units of the police stormed, often with drawn guns, a great number of houses and left-wing centres. Four people were arrested and charged with membership of a terrorist organisation (i.e. making and distributing the Radikal). Four others, who were not at home at the time of the police raid, went underground. An enormous amount of things were confiscated by the police. It was striking that the police especially looked for digital information. More than a thousand floppy disc's and various computers were taken for further research. The people arrested were held in detention under remand for six months and were only released after payment of 20.000 DM bail p.p. and a whole set of conditions they had to comply with.

Exactly one year after the raids on June 13, 1996, three of the four persons in hiding (Uli, Jutta and Frank) turned themselves in. Supported by 250 sympathisers they reported themselves at a German court after a press conference. (Matthes, the fourth person in hiding, stayed away, because he is also being charged with membership of the AIZ, the Anti Imperialist Cell's.) At the court the three persons were taken into detention under remand after which their lawyer filed a petition for immediate release on grounds of the fact that there was no reason that the suspects would again run away and that after one year there's no longer any risk that the suspects would destroy any evidence.

The petition was only partially successful. On June 15 Uli and Jutta were released, again with a lot of conditions. They had to hand in their passports, had to report themselves three times a week at the police, were not allowed any contact with anybody against whom an investigation was going on with regard to the Radikal and they had to pay a bail of 20.000 DM each.

Frank is until now held in isolation under aggravated circumstances. The Prosecution claims to have proof that he collaborated on the release of Radikal editions 153 & 154 during his period in hiding. Up till now his lawyers were not allowed look into his dossier.

New actions against the Radical took place on June 17 this year when in a number of German cities again houses were searched by the police. This time persons suspected of having a subscription to the Radikal were targeted. By way of their payments they were accused of supporting a terrorist organisation. Besides this they were suspected of letting others read the Radikal (recruiting for a terrorist organisation). For us this was another reason to put the latest issue (154) of the Radikal again on the Internet.

Despite the fact that we, the Solidaritygroup Political Prisoners (SPG) Amsterdam, declared before that we put the Radikal on Internet, the German Prosecution started an investigation against "unknown persons." This is a frequently used strategy. With an investigation on name, the Prosecution can only get permission to tap the phones etc. of a limited amount of people, while an investigation against "persons unknown" gives them much more possibilities. With this in mind it wouldn't surprise us if one of these days in Germany the police will again kick in a lot of doors in relation with the investigation against us.

The German Prosecution seems to be pretty confident at the moment and states that from the confiscated goods, they managed to compile a lot of information about the Radikal, her makers (m/f) and her structures. But we wonder if they are going to be equally confident about their actions against the digital Radikal. Censorship on the Internet creates best-sellers. With respect to the Internet this is a very important case. For the first time a European government tries to censor political news on the Internet. (Until now such action was only directed against porn on the Internet.) If the German Prosecution succeeds in their attempts to censor the Internet, the Radikal will be the first but definitely not the last. Fortunately there are many people active around the theme of censorship on the Internet and though they don't all support us ideologically, many declare themselves to sympathise with the struggle for the continuation of the Radikal on the Internet and accordingly place copies of the magazine on their Websites. On this moment the Radikal is already accessible through more than twenty addresses over the whole world. If the German Prosecution wants to sustain their attempts to block the digital Radikal they will have to block all these providers and will finally block Germany from the rest of the Internet.

-----

Read the Radikal now at:

http://burn.ucsd.edu/%7Eats/RADIKAL/
http://www.jca.or.jp/~taratta/mirror/radikal/
http://www.serve.com/~spg/
http://huizen.dds.nl/~radikal
http://www.canucksoup.net/radikal/index.html
http://www.ecn.org/radikal
http://www.well.com/~declan/mirrors/
http://www.connix.com/~harry/radikal/index.htm
http://www.ganesa.com/radikal/
http://www.denhaag.org/~radikal
http://www.knooppunt.be/~daniel/radikal
http://emma.unm.edu/radikal
http://www.tacacs.com/radikal/
http://www.dsvenlo.nl/vvd/radikal/
http://www.why.net/home/static/radi
http://users.abcs.com/dockmstr/mirror/radikal/index.htm
http://www.xs4all.nl/~jeroenw/radikal/
http://home.ipr.nl/~radikal/
http://www.dreamy.demon.co.uk/occam
http://www.ibmpcug.co.uk/~irdial/live_free/
http://zero.tolerance.org/radi/index.htm
http://www.meaning.com/library/radikal/
http://www.xs4all.nl/~irmed/radikal/
http://www.walli.uwasa.fi/~tviemero/radikal
http://www.sko.it/~sfede/radi/index.htm
http://www.bart.nl/~sz/index.html
http://www.charm.net/~gbarren/radikal
http://www.xs4all.nl/~tank/radikal/

From here we want to wish Frank in prison and Matthes where
ever he is lots of strength. The struggle continues !!

Please write to Frank (he will probably be replaced to Koln soon). His temporary address is :

Frank Grossinsky
p/a Ermittlungsrichter Wolst am BGH
Herrenstr.45a
76125 Karlsruhe
Germany
(All post will be read and censored by the police!)

11-9-1996

Solidariteitsgroep Politieke Gevangenen, (SPG Amsterdam)
tank@xs4all.nl -- http://www.xs4all.nl/~tank
*** GLOBAL ALERT ***
- Please redistribute this document widelyM
with this banner intact
- Redistribute only in appropriate places
& only until 15 October 1996

GERMAN GOVERNMENT PUSHES BLOCKAGE OF NETHERLANDS WEB SITES.

At the behest of, and in response to legal threats from, the German government, internet providers in Germany have blocked the Dutch Web site Access For All (www.xs4all.nl), removing German users' access to the entire xs4all system. The German government demanded this action because xs4all hosts a Web "home page" with so-called left-wing political content that, though fully legal in the Netherlands, is allegedly illegal in Germany. (see: http://www.anwalt.de/ictf/p960901e.htm). As a result of this action, *all* xs4all web sites, including several thousand that have nothing to do with the offending home page, are unavailable to readers in Germany.

Please send a letter of protest to the German ambassador in your country, ask your foreign minister to protest officially to the German government, and distribute this alert as widely as possible online and to the press.

Referring to article 19(2) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political rights, which Germany ratified in 1973, we, the undersigned organizations, consider this censorship an illegal act. Additionally, the value of attempting to ban content the German government finds offensive is highly questionable. The proper response to offensive expression is more and better expression, and prosecution of offending criminals, not censorship.

As a result of the overly broad censorship measure which targets an entire Internet access provider instead of a specific user, all 3000 and more Web site hosted by xs4all are virtually inaccessible in Germany. The loss of clients who market in Germany has resulted in economic damage to xs4all. The immeasurable harm of censoring thousands of other users for the speech of one is even greater.

Access for All, though it has expressed willingness to assist the Dutch police in identifying online criminals abusing the xs4all system, has a policy against censoring its clients.

Mirroring this position, at least one German Net provider has responded to the government demands with skepticism, pointing out that their compliance with the censorship request may cause them to violate contracts with their own German users, and that the government's liability threats are tantamount to holding a phone company liable for what users say on the telephone.

Instead of the futile act of censorship that has simply drawn increased attention to the offending material and resulted in its widespread availability on other sites throughout the world, the German government should have acted through legal channels and asked the authorities in the Netherlands to cooperate in determining what legal action, if any, was appropriate.

We are concerned that German internet providers have cooperated so easily with government censorship efforts. Some level of cooperation was probably assured by underhanded and rather questionable police threats of system operator liability for user content, but we must urge more resistance on that part of Net access providers to such online censorship schemes. As with libraries, there are many who would censor, but there is a responsibility on the part of providers of access to information, to work to protect that access, else libraries, and Internet service providers, lose the reason for their existence.

We ask that the German government refrain from further restrictive measures and intimidation of internet providers and recognize the free, democratic, world wide communications represented by the Internet.

All governments should recognize that the Internet is not a local, or even national, medium, but a global medium in which regional laws have little useful effect. "Top-down" censorship efforts not only fail to prevent the distribution of material to users in the local jurisdiction (material attacked in this manner can simply be relocated to any other country), but constitutes a direct assault on the rights and other interests of Internet users and service providers in other jurisdictions, not subject to the censorship law in question.

For press contacts, and for more information about the Internet, see the homepages for the signatories to this message:

DB-NL (Digital Citizens Foundation in the Netherlands) * http://www.xs4all.nl/~db.nl
ALCEI - Electronic Frontiers Italy * http://www.nexus.it/alcei
CITADEL-E F France *http://www.imaginet.fr/~mose/citadel
CommUnity (UK) * w.community.org.uk
Electronic Frontier Canada * http://www.efc.ca/
Electronic Frontier Foundation (USA) * http://www.eff.org
Electronic Frontiers Australia * http://www.efa.org.au/

Other signatures:
NLIP, Dutch Foundation for Internet Providers * http://www.nlip.n
Internet Providers Rotterdam *http://www.ipr.nl Digitaal Werknet
Nederland, foundation to promote free datatraffic,* http://www.dwn.nl
* http://www.zerberus.de
National Writers Union (UAW LOCAL 1981 AFL-CIO) * http://www.nwu.org/nwu/
Nizkor Project * http://www.nizkor.org/
Internet Access Foundation (NL) * http://www.iaf.nl/
Digitale Stad Venlo * http://www.dsvenlo.nl
CSO * http://www.canucksoup.net/


U.S. McLibel Support Campaign
Press Office
PO Box 62
Craftsbury VT 05826-0062
Phone/Fax 802-586-9628
Email dbriars@world.std.com

http://www.mcspotlight.org/ http://www.interlog.com/eye/Misc/McLibel
To subscribe to the "mclibel" electronic mailing list, send email To: majordomo@world.std.com Subject: Message: subscribe mclibel To unsubscribe, change the message to: "unsubscribe mclibel"
WBAI's Local Board Votes to Support the Union

The Local Advisory Board of WBAI-fm, Pacifica Radio's New York Station, passed a resolution on September 18 dissenting from Pacifica National's attempt to virtually decertify WBAI's union. The resolution is significant in light of a declaration by the Pacifica National Board in July 1995, which asked dissenters from national policy to resign. Pacifica's current by-laws allow the National Board to dissolve local station boards unilaterally. This has occurred in the past on more than one occasion.

Pacifica's national management, headed by Executive Director Pat Scott, is attempting to exclude unpaid staff from the collective bargaining units at WBAI and KPFA-fm, Pacifica's station in Berkeley.

Pacifica has filed a case against the workers at the National Labor Relations Board. WBAI's workers, who are represented by local 404 of the United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America are fighting back and have recently filed an unfair labor practice charge against Pacifica.

These unpaid workers have been part of the union since it was formed nine years ago and constitute about 90% of the members. This action by Pacifica is seen as part of management's current strategy to transform a loose confederation of 5 community stations into commercial-style network with decisions controlled from the top.

Pacifica's National Board of Directors will meet in New York City on September 26, in closed session. Since Pat Scott has taken over as Executive Director of the Pacifica Foundation 2 years ago, these meetings and the decisions made in them have been kept secret from the public.

Pacifica's national management has given various rationales to justify what many believe is a violation of the law. A formal complaint regarding these closed meetings has already been lodged with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Legal action is being considered.

Free Pacifica, a nationwide coalition of workers, community members, organizations and media activists has been formed to preserve community radio, advocate free speech broadcasting, grassroots access and democratic governance at Pacifica.

FreePacifica will be opening a Website on Oct.1, 1996 where the issues, arguments and evidence will be available. An announcement will be sent out when we actually open. You can join our on-line discussion group, the freepacifica mailing list, now. Write to: hulda@rop.eduM to subscribe.

Pacifica's National Board of Directors will meet in New York City on September 26, in closed session. Since Pat Scott has taken over as Executive Director of the Pacifica Foundation 2 years ago, these meetings and the decisions made in them have been kept secret from the public.

Pacifica's national management has given various rationales to justify what many believe is a violation of the law. A formal complaint regarding these secret metings has already been lodged with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Legal action is being considered.

People who wish to make their feelings known in New York this week can contact RPMartin@interport.net or call the Hotline at (212)465-7562.

A report on the WBAI resolution follows:


From: RPaul Martin
Chief Steward
WBAI-fm

Things related to the WBAI Local Board and the current crisis at WBAI:

At its meeting of June 18, 1996, the WBAI Local Board moved and seconded that, "The Station Board of WBAI opposes the current effort to change the composition of the WBAI bargaining unit." Passed 9 yes -0 no -2 abstentions.

At its meeting of September 19, 1996, the WBAI Local Board voted in favor of a motion, the exact wording of which I do not have in front of me, to bring a motion to the Pacifica National Board that it should reverse the thrust of current Pacifica management to exclude Unpaid Staff from the Collective Bargaining Unit of WBAI.

At this latter meeting, one member of the Local Board also voiced the opinion that Pat Scott should be impeached.

http://www.interport.net/~rpmartin,


From: "Lyn Gerry" redlyn@ix.netcom.com
Subject: Pacifica National Board meeting, the final day.

The Sunday morning meeting of the Pacifica National Board was enlivened by the participation of the Paid and Unpaid Staff along with a number of WBAI listeners.

The open portion of the meeting was on Sunday and lasted from 9:00 AM to noon.

The National Board had some discussions and accepted the budgets of the stations.

Board Chair Jack O'Dell brought up the motion by the WBAI Local Board to reverse the policy of trying to bust the WBAI Union by removing the Unpaid Staff from the Collective Bargaining Unit. National Board Vice Chair, and WBAI Local Board member, Cecilia McCall spoke for it. Then Roberta Brooks and Pat Scott took turns to speak against it. They simply said that it wasn't right and that it wasn't done anywhere else. The same reasons/non-reasons they've been giving all along.

What took place on this issue next was _ nothing! That was it. They moved on. I still do not know what that was. No vote was taken, no one else said another word on the subject and they moved on. This leaves the matter as it was and certainly told me that the Pacifica National Board has de facto decided to vote in favor of the union busting policy of Pat Scott.

The National Board said it would next meet in Berkeley, CA from January 21 to 25, 1997, and it would meet again from June 12, to 15, 1997, this second venue TBA.

They then went to the public comment portion of the meeting. There were 30 speakers who got 2 minutes each to say what they would.

The public portion went a bit over an hour and everyone who signed up got to speak. The place really came alive.

Listeners brought up the gag rule, ACG, spending any money at all on union busting firms, the purges at KPFA, the formats of some of the other Pacifica stations, national programming, and lots more.

One Paid Staff member pointed out that WBAI had had a million dollar membership drive, followed by a $700,000 membership drive, and then said, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"

I told them that we'd fight them to the Supreme Court on this, and anywhere else that we had to fight them. One of the producers of "Union Summer," which is airing on Pacifica, told them, among other things, to internalize their politics and stop trying to bust our union.

There were some quite emotional presentations from various people during the public portion of the meeting and folks said many good things.

The good news is that no one needs to rely on my memory on this. It was all video taped. There was some confrontation on this. At one point I saw Pat Scott go stand directly in front of one of the video tapers, and Scott even appeared to lean against the woman at one point. There was also some thing with Mark Shubb coming into physical contact with this woman at one point. I don't know if there was shoving involved or if it was an uncoordinated stumble, it happened behind a pillar from my perspective. But it all got taped.

In closing, Pat Scott gave the tired line of only having spent $1,000 on ACG, and that the AFL-CIO has never heard of ACG being union busters. Mark Shubb got up and said that they had to get rid of those people whom they'd gotten rid of at KPFK. He talked about the format of KPFK and KPFT not being dominated by music, and said that some folks had to be fired because they'd screamed at and acted badly towards the Program Director. He then went on to say that he'd never paid any money to ACG. Of course there had been that guy whom ACG had recommended, and, gosh, that guy may have worked for them in the past, but, oh well, they're no longer using him either.

The meeting ended and a number of National Board members came up to us and said they were uncomfortable with what Pacifica was doing vis-a-vis the union and they liked what we'd said, etc. Too bad none of them had said anything during the meeting.

BOTTOM LINE ------> The Pacifica National Board came to New York with a giant problem hanging over it. They have the power to solve that problem. They didn't. I have to assume that they are quite comfortable with the union busting going on and that they require significantly more moral suasion before they'll stop their attacks on us. So be it.

Aftermath - On Saturday night Pat Scott said that she was going to talk to various people at WBAI and try to reach a compromise on the Unpaid Staff issue with them. I told her that this was illegal. Roberta Brooks laughed at this (apparently she has never heard of Section 7, sub-section 8(5)d of the NLRA). Scott and Brooks also said that it might have been solved by WBAI management's attempted meeting with whomever would show up after one day's notice in May to discuss all of this. They didn't want to hear about it being illegal to go behind the backs of the culy elected union representatives.

Pat Scott was told that she'd have NLRB charges filed agains her if she indeed carried this plan out at WBAI. We also put out a Bulletin to the Staff of the station letting them know what had happened and also letting them know that Pat Scott would try this. We gave them instructions to report the details of any such attempt to the Shop Committee.

At a meeting with the assembled Staff at WBAI on Tuesday morning Scott announced that she'd seen this "memo" from the Shop Committee and would not attempt to discuss Contract negotiation matters with the Staff.

Having people not break the law is a small victory, but it's a victory. -- http://www.interport.net/~rpmartin

Demonstration Against Pacifica Foundation To Protest Union Busting and Secret Meetings Friday, September 27, 1996, 4:00 to 7:00 PM

On Friday, producers, Paid Staff, Unpaid Staff and listeners from WBAI-FM will hold a protest demonstration outside the Tudor Hotel, at 304 E. 42 St. in Manhattan, site of the Pacifica Foundation's National Board meeting.

Demonstrators will be calling for an end to the Pacifica Foundation's policy of attempting to bust the Union at WBAI by removing 90% of the current Collective Bargaining Unit from Union protection, and they'll be demanding an end to the long series of Pacifica National Board meetings which have been held in secret over the past two years. The National Board is the self-perpetuating Board of Directors which is legally in charge of the Pacifica Foundation.

In the current round of Contract negotiations WBAI Management has demanded that the Unpaid Staff of WBAI, who have been a part of the Union since its inception in 1987, be removed from the Collective Bargaining Unit and denied any protection by the Union.

Unpaid Staff have always been the largest category of workers at WBAI, and while performing work in every area of the station, they represent the majority of on-air voices and producers. WBAI Management has said that the demand to remove the Unpaid Staff from the Union comes from the Pacifica Foundation.

Besides betraying its long time on-air stance of supporting Unions and workers by attempting to bust the WBAI Union, and employing the services of the Union busting firm called The American Consulting Group, the Pacifica Foundation's National Board has held all but a couple of hours of its last two year's of meetings in secret sessions, which many believe is in violation of the California Sunshine Laws and of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's rules for stations receiving public funds.

Besides the Pacifica Foundation spending $30,000 on the union busting firm, WBAI has also spent listener-sponsors' money on legal expenses to try and get the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to remove the Unpaid Staff, and one Paid Staff member, from the Collective Bargaining Unit at WBAI.

WBAI's workers are represented by amalgamated Local 404 of the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (U.E.). The U.E. has filed Unfair Labor Practice charges against WBAI Management over its conduct in the current Contract negotiations.

Http://www.interport.net/~rpmartin


Still "in retreat":
More decisions behind closed doors by Pacifica's Board of Directors

by Lyn Gerry
The Board of Directors of the Pacifica Foundation met in secret again in New York city at the end of September. Pacifica's management has been calling these meetings "retreats" in order to circumvent the legal guidelines set by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), which provides taxpayer funds to qualifying public broadcasting entities. Pacifica receives about 1.5 million annually from the CPB.

Angry WBAI-FM workers and listeners picketed, but were kept out until a token public participation session in the final day of the three-and-a-half-day meeting.

The Board, which is the decision making body of the Foundation, meets three times per year. Since Pat Scott was confirmed as executive director of the Foundation in February 1995, these three-day meetings have each had approximately one hour open to the public. Financial and policy decisions formerly made openly, are now decided behind closed doors by a small unelected and unaccountable cadre. Pacifica Foundation holds the licenses for the five Pacifica stations (KPFA-FM (Berkeley), KPFK-FM (Los Angeles), WBAI-FM (New York), KPFT-FM (Houston), and WPFW-FM (Washington, DC).

This new secrecy is part of a constellation of actions that Executive Director Scott calls "positive." Since the secret meetings began, the Foundation has retained anti-union consultants against it's unionized workers, eliminated more than a hundred community- based programmers nationwide, centralized finances, compelled stations switch to "strip formats" in order to increase Arbitron ratings, and raised management salaries while laying off workers. There have been wholesale firings and purges of those within the organization who object to Pacifica radio's transformation from community-based media to a "professional" radio network.

Pacifica's management defends its actions as being for the good of the Foundation, and furthering the spread of "progressive" ideas. They also claim these secret meetings are legal.

A nationwide coalition of community and worker groups, known as Free Pacifica, is considering testing Pacifica's claims of legality in court. The dissenters are demanding to know why such an allegedly benign objective requires secrecy. It just doesn't make sense, they say.

Two weeks before the New York Board "retreat" was to take place, attorney William Schaap wrote to dissidents, "It seems highly unlikely that the Pacifica Foundation board could be contemplating three and a half days of matters that fall within the exceptions. Certainly general policy discussions relating to unionization in general, general status of paid versus volunteer staff, and related matters would not seem to fall within the exceptions. "

Schaap is also one of the publishers of the Covert Action Quarterly, which specializes in bringing to light the objectionable covert activities of the military/industrial complex and its front groups.

SECRET MEETINGS

The secret meeting issue has been on the table since 1995. Complaints have been made by community groups which led to an abortive investigation by the CPB. The investigation is still pending, but CPB seems disinterested in vigorously pursuing the charges.

The history of the CPB investigation reads like something from the Covert Action Quarterly: unsubstantiated claims of death threats against Pacifica management; a CPB investigator suddenly fired after a personal call to his boss by Pacifica's attorneys; the investigation files transferred to the Inspector General then left to sit; and recently, the Inspector General's sudden departure due to a heart attack.

Schaap expressed puzzlement at Pacifica's announcement that the New York meeting would be another closed session, " it seems hard to understand why the Foundation has already made such an announcement, unless they believe that the regulations in question will not be asserted by anyone, or, conceivably, that the CPB will ignore any violations of the regulations."

If the secret meetings are found to be illegal, Pacifica would forfeit its CPB funding, according to William Schaap. This is ironic, as Pacifica has been making fundraising appeals based on the alleged enmity of the CPB, and the threat of loss of funding.

CPB regulations allow a limited number of topics, such as personnel and legal matters to be held in closed session. The guidelines also permit "retreats" as long as policy decisions are not made. At the recent session in New York, finances, programming and the authority of the executive director were all discussed behind closed doors.

In the past year and a half, major policy decisions have been made in areas which do not fall within the permitted exceptions to the CPB's open meeting rule. In June of 1995, Pacifica's Finance Committee passed a resolution which closed all future finance meetings to public scrutiny. Access to minutes of these meetings have also been denied to the public.

GREETED BY PROTESTS

In New York last month, workers and community members picketed the hotel where board members were housed.

R. Paul Martin is a WBAI programmer and Chief Shop Steward for The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers (UE) which represents more than 200 paid and unpaid workers at WBAI. He reported the events in New York to the FreePacifica mailing list:

"On Friday we had a picket line outside their hotel. On Saturday we had a picket line outside the gallery that they had the reception for [Pacifica National Board Chair] Jack O'Dell in. Some of us went in and talked to O'Dell and others. I was amazed at how ignorant they were of what's going on! "

The Directors, who are nominally in charge, delegate the actual operations to a paid managerial staff headed by Pat Scott, the Executive Director. Scott has worked to increase the power of that position, and now holds sole authority to take actions that previously required approval from the Directors.

At the three hour public session on the final day, 30 speakers voiced their objections to various aspects of the new Pacifica conduct and policy. There were no speakers supporting the Scott administration, according to witnesses.

R. Paul Martin reported:

"The open portion of the meeting was on Sunday and lasted from 9:00 AM to noon.

The National Board had some discussions and accepted the budgets of the stations.

Board Chair Jack O'Dell brought up the motion by the WBAI Local Board to reverse the policy of trying to bust the WBAI Union by removing the Unpaid Staff from the Collective Bargaining Unit. National Board Vice Chair, and WBAI Local Board member, Cecilia McCall spoke for it. Then Roberta Brooks [a Director and staffer for Representative Ron Dellums] and Pat Scott took turns to speak against it. They simply said that it wasn't right and that it wasn't done anywhere else. The same reasons/non-reasons they've been giving all along.

What took place on this issue next was _ nothing!... No vote was taken, no one else said another word on the subject and they moved on. This leaves the matter as it was and certainly told me that the Pacifica National Board has de facto decided to vote in favor of the union busting policy of Pat Scott.

The National Board said it would next meet in Berkeley, CA from January 21 to 25, 1997, and it would meet again from June 12, to 15, 1997, this second venue TBA.

They then went to the public comment portion of the meeting. There were 30 speakers who got 2 minutes each to say what they would.

The public portion went a bit over an hour and everyone who signed up got to speak. The place really came alive.

Listeners brought up the gag rule, ACG [the union-busters hired by Pacifica], spending any money at all on union busting firms, the purges at KPFA, the formats of some of the other Pacifica stations, national programming, and lots more.

One Paid Staff member pointed out that WBAI had had a million dollar membership drive, followed by a $700,000 membership drive, and then said, `If it ain't broke, don't fix it!'

I told them that we'd fight them to the Supreme Court on this, and anywhere else that we had to fight them. One of the producers of `Union Summer,' which is airing on Pacifica, told them, among other things, to internalize their politics and stop trying to bust our union."

[UE has publicly condemned union-busting efforts by Pacifica management, which is attempting to decertify unpaid workers, who constitute 90% of the bargaining unit. Pacifica has asked the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to rule on this. The NLRB is scheduled to release it's decision regarding the unpaid workers this month.]

R. Paul Martin continued:

"There were some quite emotional presentations from various people during the public portion of the meeting and folks said many good things.

The good news is that no one needs to rely on my memory on this. It was all video taped. There was some confrontation on this. At one point I saw Pat Scott go stand directly in front of one of the video tapers, and Scott even appeared to lean against the woman at one point. There was also some thing with Mark Shubb [Manager of KPFK-FM, Los Angeles] coming into physical contact with this woman at one point. I don't know if there was shoving involved or if it was an uncoordinated stumble, it happened behind a pillar from my perspective. But it all got taped.

In closing, Pat Scott gave the tired line of only having spent $1,000 on ACG [ The American Consulting Group, which specializes in union-busting], and that the AFL-CIO has never heard of ACG being union busters [this is false].

Mark Shubb got up and said that they had to get rid of those people whom they'd gotten rid of at KPFK. He talked about the format of KPFK and KPFT not being dominated by music, and said that some folks had to be fired because they'd screamed at and acted badly towards the Program Director.

He then went on to say that he'd never paid any money to ACG. Of course there had been that guy whom ACG had recommended, and, gosh, that guy may have worked for them in the past, but, oh well, they're no longer using him either.

The meeting ended and a number of National Board members came up to us and said they were uncomfortable with what Pacifica was doing vis-a-vis the union and they liked what we'd said, etc. Too bad none of them had said anything during the meeting.

BOTTOM LINE ------> The Pacifica National Board came to New York with a giant problem hanging over it. They have the power to solve that problem. They didn't. I have to assume that they are quite comfortable with the union busting going on and that they require significantly more moral persuasion before they'll stop their attacks on us. So be it.

Aftermath - On Saturday night Pat Scott said that she was going to talk to various people at WBAI and try to reach a compromise on the Unpaid Staff issue with them. I told her that this was illegal. Roberta Brooks laughed at this (apparently she has never heard of Section 7, sub-section 8(5)d of the NLRA)..... They didn't want to hear about it being illegal to go behind the backs of the duly elected union representatives.

Pat Scott was told that she'd have NLRB charges filed against her if she indeed carried this plan out at WBAI. We also put out a Bulletin to the Staff of the station letting them know what had happened and also letting them know that Pat Scott would try this. We gave them instructions to report the details of any such attempt to the Shop Committee.

At a meeting with the assembled Staff at WBAI on Tuesday morning Scott announced that she'd seen this "memo" from the Shop Committee and would not attempt to discuss Contract negotiation matters with the Staff.

Having people not break the law is a small victory, but it's a victory. "

**********************************************************************
To learn more about the issues and the battle for the soul of Pacifica radio, visit the Free Pacifica Community Radio Forum on the World Wide Web-- http://www.freepacifica.org If you don't have Web accesss, you can join the e-mail discussion group by writing to hulda@rop.edu and asking to subscribe to the FreePacifica mailing list.



From: "Lyn Gerry" redlyn@ix.netcom.com
********************************************
Gagging In His Grave:
An Open Letter to Alternative Media in America
September 9, 1996

Pacifica Radio's Executive Director, Pat Scott, has justified the recent actions of her administration as being necessary to "find solutions to benefit our audiences." She claims Pacifica is now embarked in building a "modern, effective, relevant radio network, which will challenge and impact the status quo." Something that can not be done, "as long as we speak only to ourselves."

At KPFK, Pacifica's Los Angeles station, listeners are now "benefitting" by having timely material on Ralph Nader withheld in order to extort their contributions. Pacifica's founder Lew Hill, who developed listener-sponsorship as a freely made covenant between the broadcaster and the listener, can only be gagging in his grave.

A memo posted at KPFK-FM, shows how its new "program director" Kathy Lo is "impacting the status quo."

_________________________________________________________ August 23, 1996

To: Diane James
Roy Tuckman

From: Kathy Lo

>From now until October 20, do not broadcast any Alternative Radio programs that include Ralph Nader. If there are any changes, I will notify you of this in writing. Thanks for your cooperation.

______________________________________________________________
Is this a plot to censor Nader's message? An attempt to keep Nader from participating in the presidential debates? No, Kathy Lo is unaware of the political implications. This is about the bottom line.

KPFK's next on-air fundraising drive will start on October 4, and run to October 18. A tape of KPFK's broadcast of Nader's acceptance speech will be offered as an incentive to subscribe. A recently mailed fundraising letter from station manager Mark Schubb mentions KPFK's live broadcast of Nader's speech as one of the reasons listeners should contribute. It appears listeners will not get to hear more of Nader, until they do contribute.

Lo also attempted to prevent Roy Tuckman, the producer of a late night program, from broadcasting Nader's speech for his night owls; fortunately for his listeners, Tuckman had already run the speech before the memo from Lo was issued. Otherwise, they would not have heard Nader's acceptance speech on KPFK until the fund drive, when they would also be asked for money to support "their " station.

As a former KPFK staff member who spent 7 years deeply involved in fundraising at the station, I am completely appalled by current management's obliviousness to the public service Pacifica's mission mandates. . In the old, "irrevelant, elitist" Pacifica, a "fundraising strategy" such as Lo's would have been shouted down in outrage. Now, of course, anyone who shouts about anything is fired for "insubordination."

What I want to know is: what exactly is it going to take for the alternative media to cover the story of what the so-called "positive changes" at Pacifica Radio really entail? I pose this question particularly to The Nation magazine and FAIR----as two media entities who have broadcasts on Pacifica radio which they are using to increase their own subscriber bases. Since those Pacifica listeners who are also now their subscribers are in many cases completely unaware of what is occurring due to a gag rule imposed at Pacifica---- what moral obligation do these organizations have to these individuals?

Pat Scott has also said, "But our opposition has chosen to couch this in terms of a moral struggle," a framework she apparently doesn't consider "relevant." Perhaps The Nation, which produces RadioNation at KPFK, and FAIR, whose previous Los Angeles Chapter Director, Mark Schubb, is now general manager of KPFK (and FAIR's current LA Director, Jim Horowitz, sits on the KPFK advisory board) share Pat Scott's view of "moral struggle" as no longer "relevant" to an organization founded to promote peace and justice.

To The Nation, FAIR and the other organizations who may have kept silent for fear you too will lose access to airtime, haven't you realized everyone is now expendable in the Brave New Pacifica?

Many people have expressed private qualms about the situation at Pacifica, but have hesitated to take public action for fear of "destroying the institution." Can't you see that is already happening?

If you want to do something about it, you can. Be journalists---report the story--all of it. There has been enough silence.

Lyn Gerry
former KPFK staff member
fired--and proud of it!


Dear Michael,

Speaking of Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting---did you ever see this article? It may heve been distributed on Activ-L in July?

Lyn

What's Fair (is FAIR)?
****************************
The summer issue of Covert Action Quarterly gives a glowing review of "The FAIR Reader: An `Extra!' Review of Press and Politics in the `90's." The reviewer writes, "Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, has been around for a decade now, and its work is invaluable. Against a steady drumbeat of complaints about `liberal media bias,' FAIR is there with a reality check. These media watchdogs work from the premise that the corporate owned mass-media might just have an agenda other than `objective journalism.'"

CAQ continues, "...And they have become a force to be reckoned with. Among recent coups, they punctured talk radio's leading gasbag with "Rush Limbaugh's Reign of Error," in which they debunked claim after ludicrous claim....."

Unfortunately, on the subject of the ludicrous claims made by the current managers of the Pacifica Foundation, their silence has been conspicuous. This leads some to speculate, what other "recent coups" they may have been involved with.

A small self-perpetuating group has seized control of the Pacifica Foundation, making what Executive Director Pat Scott calls "positive changes." These positive changes include: 1) holding board meetings in secrecy in violation of CPB policy 2) hiring a firm called The American Consulting Group, listed by the AFL-CIO as a union-buster, to render impotent the unions at its three biggest stations, KPFA (Berkeley), KPFK (Los Angeles) and WBAI (New York), and 3) systematically embarking on a program moving away from the historic grassroots broadcasting the Foundation has done for half a century.

Executive Director Pat Scott continues to issue conflicting denials, in spite of a growing amount of media coverage questioning the activites of the Foundation's management.

FAIR has not been one of the sources covering the hijacking of the nation's only truly non-commercial radio network. At the Los Angeles station, a strong FAIR presence leads many to question FAIR's level of paticipation. Jim Horowitz, director of FAIR's Los Angeles Chapter is one of the few remaining members of KPFK's local advisory board (the rest were expelled by Scott, or resigned in protest after she delivered a written ultimatum informing board members dissenters were not welcome.)

Mark Schubb, a former director of FAIR-LA, was appointed general manager of KPFK by Scott. He now sits beside an American Consulting Group adviser in contract negotiations with KPFK's union. He has also been responsible for removing from the air people who have attempted to raise issues regarding Pacifica's change of direction, and , for issuing a memo informing personnel they would be removed from the air for announcing any public forum where these issues would be discussed.

Personnel are under a gag order, called the "dirty laundry rule,"issued by top Pacifica brass. Under his tenure, a record number of people have been banned from KPFK's building, as well as its air, for voicing disagreement.

Lisa McCready, another FAIR-LA member, is left in charge when Schubb is absent. Although McCready has no official staff position with the station, she has been issuing orders to paid staff and handling confidential files. Over the past year, she has been sent to public meetings, where issues of the situation at KPFK/Pacifica have been raised, to report back to Schubb.

Of "The FAIR Reader," CAQ also writes, " Along the way, it offers insightful, devastating, even morbidly humorous critiques of the media stance on the issues of the day."

So, one wonders, when will FAIR do an "insightful, devastating" critique of the dismantling of the last grassroots radio outlet in Los Angeles?

Not anytime soon, the word is. The FAIR central committee has decided the events are a non-story. Such a non-story that the FreeKPFA(Pacifica) mailing list has received a message asking that people cease and desist sending them information on the Pacifica situation.

Lyn Gerry


From: MichaelP papadop@peak.org Subject: Re: FCC generally

There's a lot of interesting reading in the FCC's Web pages at URL-- http://www.fcc.gov/ not just the name of the commissioners but also stuff relating to broadcasting generally.

You may recall, when there was discussion of Pacifica selling off valuable frequencies, I pased on the thought that actual broadcast communication for radio could well be less important than broadcasting the same programs via internet. The technique is there , and the opportunity has been created

I'm reading the legislation and the FCC ruling rather carefully, and it seems to me that any "information provider" now has been given the power to demand access and to get access to the telcomm (phone and cable) companies' transmission lines for the transmission of its information to the ends of the internet. This means that the programs of any station can be put out and received everywhere, not just in a recognized reception area [60(?) mile radius for KPFA], and may also be "heard" live or at a more convenient time just as we now handle e-mail. The technology is there, the broadcasters will have to transform their output into digital form, and the recipient will have to have some kind of "box" to receive/store/play what is put out. In this respect "pirate" radio and the most powerful commercial radio stations will be on identical footing, the FCC's "rationing" of scarce radio spectrum will be much less important than it is now, and the "listener" will totally control access to "broadcast" material, because no longer totally dependent on what comes over the "airwaves".

I'll have more to say about this subject in due course; but the time frame involved is a matter of months rather than of years or decades.The technology is already there as is the multiple choice of paths for sending wide bandwith material from a source to a receiver.[Realaudio is already available for you to pick up selected programs with next to no audio quality.]

thought you'd be interested.
Michael


To: mbrauns1@passage.net
From: jesse@lglobal.com (Jesse Hirsh)
Subject: Re: hi there

"and behind the most creative aspect of that insurrection looms a band of reality hackers, merry pranksters, ontological anarchists, psychedellic warriors, and intelligence agents; the bastard progeny of Toronoto's own McLuhan: The Media Collective"

The Media Collective

'Bringing Culture Back To Resistance'

The Media Collective is a spontaneous, dynamic, holistic organization, that includes the universe as its membership. We are artists, activists, and people interested in reclaiming our environment, reclaiming our minds, and thus reclaiming our lives. The Collective itself is a conduit for change.

The term 'Media' does not refer to an institution, or a technological artefact, but rather to the environment in which we all live. Media are the methods in which we communicate with ourselves, each other, and the world at large. As we communicate, we forge the material reality in which we exist.

Centuries of empire, appropriation, and exploitation have consolidated and centralized control of the majority of media. Corporate concentration manifests itself as the realization of a true media monopoly, declaring the birth of a new regime, and the end of history. His story has robbed us of our sovereignty, robbed us of our land, robbed us of our voice, and may soon rob us of our minds.

The Media Collective is a spontaneous proclamation of the self. It is an uprising of the free individual spirit, shedding the chains of mental colonialization, screaming shouts of joy with the self-realization of identity.

We break the homogeneity of the media monopoly by expressing ourselves with our own media. We take back our media, taking back our freedom, igniting a chain-reaction of self-expression, a revolution of many minds uniting against a common enemy.

We use guerrilla tactics and any means necessary to defend our freedom of speech which is not defined according to profitability. We are involved in video, mirco-power broadcasting, radio, art, graffiti, zines, performance art, food, street theatre, cartoons, faxing, fasting, civil-disobedience, newspapers, music, hacking, phreaking, luddism, the web, television, writing, email, video-conferencing, elite-crashing, talking, loving, reading, ranting, telephony, protesting, analysis, and straight-out revolution.

We are the virus of unity. All may take claim under our banner as all are subject to media, and all have an interest in controlling their own media. We seek to decentralize power by decreasing the degree of mediation between us. Together we can all help each other help ourselves.

The Media Collective meets on the 27th of each month. The meetings act as a forum for members to exchange experiences, thoughts, ideas, and actions. The next Toronto meeting will be held at 7pm at XXX, 7 Fraser, near Dufferin and King.

Members outside of Toronto are encouraged to organize local meetings, events, and take part in their own spontaneous actions. We will soon have a comprehensive web site available as well as other resources in other media to encourage the spread of the virus. Send comments, questions, and reports tomedia@lglobal.com

"And one day all the slaves ran free, Something inside of them died. The only thing I could do was be me And get on that train and ride."

We're planning an International gathering in Toronto for October 27. The purpose of this gathering is to draft an International program for an International Media Collective.


From: "Bruce Girard" bgirard@ECNET.ec
Organization: Pulsar/AMARC

NGOs & the ITU: A possibility for cooperation?

Bruce Girard
Director, Agencia Informativa Púlsar

You may not know much about it. You may not even have ever heard of it. But if you are a broadcaster the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has undoubtedly had a significant impact on your work and will continue to do so. Established in 1947, the ITU is a specialised agency within the United Nations system. Its stated goal is to promote the development of telecommunications globally, and its broad definition of telecommunications includes telephones, radio broadcasting, satellite communication, and the so-called information superhighway. It is organised into three sectors:

# The Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) works for the "rational, equitable, efficient and economic use of the radiofrequency spectrum". It is within ITU-R that it is decided what frequencies will be able to be used in your country and for what purposes.

# The Standardisation Sector (ITU-S) studies and adopts recommendations regarding technical standards and tariffs. ITU-S recommendations will be influential in the current debate over what technical standards should be adopted for digital broadcasting - a debate with important repercussions for all broadcasters.

# The Development Sector (ITU-D) works as an executing agency for projects which develop communications infrastructures, particularly in lesser developed countries.

Given the tremendous social and economic importance of telecommunications as we near the end of the 20th century, the decisions, recommendations and actions of each of these sectors have tremendous social impacts. For example, in the 1970s, ITU-R set about distributing frequencies for satellite use. At the time, few of the lesser-developed countries took notice and the predictable result was that a few Northern countries snapped up tremendous bandwidth. ITU-R also determines which frequencies will be available for social communication, and which will be reserved for military or commercial use.

The case of digital audio broadcasting (DAB) provides an example of the social importance of ITU-S. The recommendations of technicians not only determine frequency propagation and audio quality, they also can favour a technology that supports a more centralised broadcast system or one that facilitates access and encourages a more pluralistic broadcast environment.

For its part, ITU-D has an entire department dedicated to supporting and advising countries wanting to privatise state- owned telephone companies, and little information for a country that might prefer to maintain an important state presence in a key sector.

ITU members - Big M and little m

Unlike other UN agencies (UNESCO, the United Nations Development Program, the World Health Organisation), which have adopted mechanisms enabling the participation of non governmental organisations as representatives of civil society, the ITU only admits two categories of members. The 184 "big M members" are States within the United Nations system, and the 375 "small m members" include all the major telecoms service providers, equipment manufacturers and satellite organisations. In a forthcoming article, the ITU's Secretary General, Dr. Pekka Tarjanne describes the role of the private sector in the agency as "perhaps the single most important strategic issue which we at the ITU have to face. If we are to remain responsive and relevant to the telecoms industry, enhanced private sector involvement is vital." Given that there are already twice as many "small m" members as "big M" ones, that private sector members can generally call on greater resources in their research and lobbying efforts, and that the wave of privatisation of telecoms infrastructure that is sweeping the world is reducing public influence in the area, it is becoming increasingly important to consider a third category of membership, one that will ensure the participation of civil society within the ITU.

In October 1995 Seán O Siochrú, produced a report entitled "International Telecommunication Union and Non-Governmental Organisations: the Case for Mutual Cooperation". The report, prepared as an initative of the MacBride Round Table with the approval of the Secretary General of the ITU, not only presents a strong case for closer collaboration between the ITU and the NGO sector, it also makes recommendations for how to go about establishing the mechanisms that will enable this collaboration to happen.

Action

In March 1996 AMARC adopted the O Siochrú report's recommendations in principal and decided to embark on a campaign to ensure that they are studied seriously and eventually adopted by the ITU. In cooperation with other international NGOs working in communications, we have requested that the ITU study the report and make recommendations to its plenipotentiary conference in 1998. While we have not yet received a formal answer, sources within the ITU say that the campaign is being taken seriously and we are hopeful that the ITU will consider our request and that civil society will be able to participate formally in the ITU's structures.

Readers of InteRadio are requested to write the ITU requesting that the agency give serious consideration to the recommendations in O Siochrú's report and to the principal of NGO participation within the ITU. Please write or fax the following people: Pekka Tarjanne, Secretary General, Fax: +41-22 730 5137, Don MacLean, Head, Strategic Planning Unit, Fax: +41-22 730 6503, Ahmed Laouyane, Head, Telecommunications Development Bureau, Fax: +41-22 730 5485. The postal address for the ITU is:
Place des nations
CH-1211 Geneva 20
Switzerland

___________________________________________________
Bruce Girard
Pulsar - AMARC
Email: bgirard@pulsar.org.ec
http://www.web.net/amarc/pulsar.html Tel: +593-2-525521 Fax: +593-542818
Av. America 3584, Casilla 17-08-8489, Quito, Ecuador


News Release for UTK news and information junkies:

NEW ROCK90 now airs the following public affairs programming:

Alternative Radio- Tue 4-5pm
Sun 10-11am
A lecture/interview show featruing speakers like Mumia abu Jamal. Barbara Ehrenreich and Noam Chomsky. Aired on WUOT for five years before taken off last fall.

Making Contact- Tue morning 8:05-8:35
every other Sunday 11:30-12pm
Single issue news magazine with audio from local reporters with writers, scholars and activists around the country.

RadioNation- Wed. 8:05-8:35am
every other Sunday morning 11-11:30
News magazine on arts, cyberspace, politics and more from the Publication The Nation.

Second Opinion- Thu. 8:05-8:35am every other Sunday morning 11-11:30
A half hour one-on-one interview show from the publication the Progressive.

Counterspin- Fri. 8:05-8:35 am
every other sunday morning 11:30-12
Media analysis show by Fair and Accuracy in Reporting. Very well researched and produced show; succintly exposes misinformation and outright lies. They've taken a hard look at Rush Limbaugh, NPR and Ted Koppel.

Contact Mike Knapp at the above e-mail or phone at 523-6293. Are currently attempting to bring Pacifica on air. The station could definitely use any financial support for this capital outlay of @$3K for the sattelite signal decoder. Hope you tune in- its well worth it and a lot better than Ollie North, Hal Hill or Channel 8!

-MK


Date sent: Sun, 20 Oct 1996 11:07:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: PBRS (fwd)
To: Michael Braunstein mbrauns1@passage.net

My name is Larry Knapp. I am organizing a public radio distribution service with the following mission statement.....

PBRS Mission Statement
PBRS (Public Broadcasting Radio Services) has been organized to strengthen and expand public radio. Our specific goals include (1) gathering radio programming of exceptional quality from radio producers in the USA and around the world and making this programming available to all non-commercial radio stations, (2) development and implementation of methods which will increase public radio audiences at local and national levels, (3) development and implementation of methods designed to bring non-commercial radio stations to a condition of self-sufficiency without sacrificing programming integrity and (4) development and implementation of programs of business underwriting which serve the best interests of both public radio and the businesses who support public radio.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

We are looking for programming in the following categories: Drama, Mystery/Suspense, Children's Programs, Comedy, Music and last but definitely not least - News & Investigative Reports...a Chomskyan news magazine would be nice, don't you think?

PBRS will be picking up programming from the CBC, the BBC and other major systems around the world for quality and name recognition, but I would like to see PBRS operate as a clearinghouse and center of exchange for community based/locally produced programs.

The PBRS Features & Entertainment Catalog which will go to all 1,800 public radio stations in the US. The catalog will have two sections (1) Individual Programs, and (2) 13 Week Program Blocks. Any program sent in will be listed in the Individual Program Section wherein the program provider names the price. The good stuff will go into 13 Week Program Blocks under the categories listed above. The 13 Week Program Blocks will cost $520 for the 13 weeks ($40 per program hour), any program provider who want a piece in a block will have to consent to this price. PBRS will split 50/50 with the program provider. PBRS will cover all costs of marketing, duplication and distribution.

The most important aspect of PBRS will be the PBRS Corporate Sponsorship Program. This program will gather financial underwriting on local regional and national levels and re-distributing this financial support at local regional and national levels. In other words, the PBRS Features & Entertainment catalog will offer stations programming and the money to book the programming at the same time.

Larry Knapp
Public Broadcasting Radio Services
37 Central Square
Lynn MA 01902
(617) 593-4934


Subject: new pirate radio! Lawrence KS!

Starting Thanksgiving a 6-10 watt transmitter will "provide the community with an open forum of ideas and music that is not dominated by commercial control, said Rich Wenzel, co-organizer." The station will be run by 10 volunteers at:

Liberty Hall
642 Massachusetts St.
Lawrence KS 66044


InfoBox Free Radio Berkeley
1442 A Walnut St., #406, Berkeley, CA 94709
E-Mail
frbspd@crl.com


Fall, 1996. #15 Copyright 1996
RADIO RESISTOR'S BULLETIN
$10.00 / year (articles encouraged!!)
PO Box 862051, Tuscaloosa, AL 35486-862051
E-Mail: mbrauns1@passage.net
URL: www.rootsworld.com/rw/feature/rrb.html
Please support the Bulletin with your ideas and articles.
This is a "participatory" publication with a world-wide readership.
Letters, articles art work and ideas can be sent to either the postal or E-Mail address.


Free Radio Press
Michael Braunstein
Mbrauns1@wwisp.com
HTTP://www.wwisp.com/~mbrauns1
The Free Radio Press
http://www.rootsworld.com/rw/feature/rrb.html

Previous issues:
RRB # 5 | RRB # 6 | RRB # 7 | RRB # 8 | RRB #9 | RRB #10 | RRB #11 | RRB #12 | RRB #13 | RRB #14


Return to RootsWorld.